Last edited by Masar
Tuesday, July 14, 2020 | History

3 edition of Perspectives on crime victims found in the catalog.

Perspectives on crime victims

Perspectives on crime victims

  • 123 Want to read
  • 26 Currently reading

Published by C.V. Mosby Co. in Saint Louis .
Written in English

    Places:
  • United States
    • Subjects:
    • Victims of crimes -- United States -- Addresses, essays, lectures.,
    • Victims of crimes -- Addresses, essays, lectures.

    • Edition Notes

      Includes bibliographies and index.

      Statementedited by Burt Galaway, Joe Hudson.
      ContributionsGalaway, Burt., Hudson, Joe.
      Classifications
      LC ClassificationsHV6250.3.U5 P47
      The Physical Object
      Paginationxiii, 435 p. ;
      Number of Pages435
      ID Numbers
      Open LibraryOL4105260M
      ISBN 100801617332
      LC Control Number80019922

      The particular book Environmental Crime and its Victims: Perspectives within Green Criminology has a lot associated with on it. So when you read this book you can get a lot of help. The book was compiled by the.   Environmental crime is one of the most profitable and fastest growing areas of international criminal activity. These types of crime, however, do not always produce an immediate consequence, and the harm may be diffused/5.

      The perspective of traditional victimology perspectives can explain how relationship between victims, offenders, and the environment itself might induce cyberbullying [9, 10] the traditional. The author engages these questions, drawing on in-depth interviews with 22 victims of violent crime. It is argued that survivors' views of justice do not fit well into either retributive or.

      Get this from a library! Child victims of crime: problems and perspectives. [M C Gupta; K Chockalingam; Jaytilak Guha Roy; Indian Society of Victimology.; Indian Institute of Public Administration.; Indian Society of Victimology. Biennial Conference;] -- Contributed articles presented at the Third Biennial Conference of the Indian Society of Victimology held at Indian . Environmental Crime and Its Victims: Perspectives Within Green Criminology Toine Spapens, Rob White, Marieke Kluin Environmental crime is one of the most profitable and fastest growing areas of international criminal activity.


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Perspectives on crime victims Download PDF EPUB FB2

Lorraine Elliott, Australian National University ’This book contains thought-provoking perspectives drawn from theory and practice on a persisting global problem: environmental crime. In addition to important insights on villains and victims, it provides new ideas on what should be considered an environmental crime as well as practical.

This book provides a thorough account of victimisation across the social spectrum of class, race, age and gender. Perspectives on crime victims book second edition has been fully revised and expanded, with two parts now spanning.

Perspectives on crime victims. [Burt Galaway; Joe Hudson;] Home. WorldCat Home About WorldCat Help. Search. Search for Library Items Search for Lists Search for Book: All Authors / Contributors: Burt Galaway; Joe Hudson.

Find more information about: ISBN: OCLC Number: The author examines the victims' plight, carefully placing statistics from the FBI's Uniform Crime Report and Bureau of Justice Statistics National Crime Victimization Survey in context. At the same time, he humanizes victims' stories through compelling case studies.

But as the title states, the book focuses mostly on the victims whereas so many true crime books focus on the criminals. We find that the victims are numerous even if the target of the crime was only one. Most, if not all, of the immediate victims of crimes Cited by: Chapter 1: Perspectives on Victimology Chapter 2: Crime and its Impact Chapter 3: The Place of the Victim in Non-Western Societies Chapter 4: The ‘Rebirth’ of the Victim as a Significant Actor Chapter 5: Immediate Help for the Victims of Crime Chapter 6: Victims, Courts and Compensation Chapter 7: Developing an Appreciation of the Victim: Looking to ‘Eastern Europe’.

Discussing these topics from the point of view of green criminological theory, sociology, law enforcement, community wellbeing, environmental activism and victimology, this book will be of great interest to all those concerned about crime and the environment.

Includes new chapters on defining and constructing victims, fear and vulnerability, sexuality, white collar crime and the implications of crime policy on victims Examines a global range of historical and theoretical perspectives in victimology and features a new chapter on researching victims of crime.

Inin his book Patterns of Forcible Rape, Israeli criminologist Menachem Amir attempted to apply the concept of victim-precipitated crime when studying victims of rape.

His claims that 19 percent of assault victims have only themselves to blame for their victimization came under fire not only from scholars but also from feminists.

Environmental Crime and its Victims book. Perspectives within Green Criminology. Environmental Crime and its Victims. DOI link for Environmental Crime and its Victims. Environmental Crime and its Victims book. Perspectives within Green Criminology. Edited By Toine Spapens, Rob White, Marieke Kluin.

Features Victims of Crime is the ideal core textbook for victims of crime and general victims courses, and an excellent resource for researchers, practitioners, victims' rights advocates, and those who deal with victims in the fields of Law, Social Work, Counseling, and Criminal Justice.

Perspective on black knife crime when she states “most violent crime is conducted by white people and the majority of stabbing victims in Britain are white. We should focus on the issue. Cybercrime and its victims explores the social construction of violence and victimisation in online spaces and brings together scholars from many areas of inquiry, including criminology, sociology, and cultural, media, and gender studies.

The book is organised thematically into five parts. Delving into victim involvement in the criminal justice system, the impact of crime on victims, and new directions in victimology and victim assistance, authors Yoshiko Takahashi and Chadley James provide crucial insights and practical applications into the field of victim assistance.

Counseling Crime Victims provides a unique approach to helping victims of crime. By distilling and combining the best insights and lessons from the fields of criminology, victimology, trauma psychology, law enforcement, and psychotherapy, this book presents an integrated model of intervention for students and working mental health professionals.

Finally, the book presents comparative international research on approaches to crime prevention, education, and legislation to address the victimization of the elderly. This work will be of interest to students in criminology and criminal justice, as well as.

In criminology, examining why people commit crime is very important in the ongoing debate of how crime should be handled and prevented.

Many theories have emerged over the years, and they continue to be explored, individually and in combination, as criminologists seek the best solutions in ultimately reducing types and levels of crime.

Here is [ ]. Examining the standing of victims globally, this book provides a comparative analysis of the role of the victim in the International Criminal Court, the ad hoc tribunals leading to the development of the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia and the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda, together with the Extraordinary Chambers of the.

This book is dedicated to the many thousands of victim advocates and Historical Perspective on Victimology 2 Victim Programs, Legislation, and Funding 4 Costs: Tangible and Human Costs of the effectiveness of crisis intervention with violent crime victims at neighborhood offi ces of the Victim Services Agency (VSA) in New York City.

The Psychology of Criminal and Antisocial Behavior: Victim and Offenders Perspectives is not just another formulaic book on forensic psychology. Rather, it opens up new areas of enquiry to busy practitioners and academics alike, exploring topics using a practical approach to social deviance that is underpinned by frontier research findings.

New Visions of Crime Victims will be of interest to academics, students, criminal justice practitioners and policy-makers. It has particular implications for scholarship in the fields of. Environmental crime is one of the most profitable and fastest growing areas of international criminal activity.

These types of crime, however, do not always produce an immediate consequence, and the harm may be diffused. As such, the complexity of victimization - in terms of time, space, impact Pages: What are the meanings of justice, as seen from the perspective of victims of violent crime?

Are victims' visions of justice represented by the conventional legal system? Are they represented by restorative justice? The author engages these questions, drawing on in-depth interviews with 22 victims of violent crime. It is argued that survivors' views of justice do not fit well into either.